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-Judge Censors Lawyer From Asking for Prayers During Trials

by Dr. D ~ August 17th, 2016

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                                  (Image: Wikipedia)

Several times a Texas DA has convinced a judge to stop a Christian lawyer from asking for prayers on Facebook during a trial. Here’s the details from Dallas Fort Worth CBS Local News:

Freedom of religion, freedom of speech, the right to a fair trial, and Facebook postings have stirred-up a hornet’s nest in  Ellis County.

It starts with Waxahachie lawyer Mark Griffith, who  doesn’t mind telling anyone he prays for help before court, during a trial and on Facebook.

It’s the Facebook part that is at issue, another new twist in the odd world that social media has created.

Twice, in separate trials, the Ellis County District Attorney’s office has convinced judges to stop Griffith from posting running commentary of a trial in his prayers on Facebook.

<Read the whole article>

UPDATE (8/19): Here’s more information about this case from the Blaze:

Texas Lawyer Fights Back After Judge Tells Him to Stop Talking About His Faith on Social Media

Response: Interesting situation. Judges should not have the authority to stop a lawyer from publically asking for prayers or publically praying. On the other hand they claim that details of the trial itself are being shared by Griffin in his prayers on Facebook and that is the real problem.

Since I do not know the details of this case and what the lawyer might have actually revealed during his prayers on Facebook, I can only make some general observations. Methinks that the DA probably ‘doth protest too much’ in order to gain some leverage.

Another case where the freedom of religion is probably being subjected to unwarranted limitations. Mark Griffin says that he is going to appeal. It will be interesting to see what the outcome will be. Comments from anyone with a greater understanding of this case and situation would be appreciated. Particularly from any of my readers with a background in the law.                *Top

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