web analytics

Don’t Miss an Update! -Subscribe:

MY OTHER BLOGS–RECENT POSTS:

Creative Commons license

Religion Blogs - Blog Top Sites

Archives

Visitor Map

Locations of visitors to this page

Join Our Facebook Network

-LESSON 7: MARK 5

by Dr. D ~

Mark 5:  Things you don’t see everyday:

Vs. 7-  The Demons recognize who Jesus really is

Vs. 8-13  Jesus expels thousand of demons

Vs. 29  Woman is healed by touching the clothes of Jesus

Vs. 30  Jesus felt her touch, even in the crowd.

Vs. 41-42  Jesus raises a little girl from the dead

Vs. 1-20:  The Gerasene Demoniac

Located on the east bank of the Sea of Galilee. It was a Gentile area, as can be seen by the thousands of pigs they kept.  Some Manuscripts refer to the region as ‘Gaderene’ which would be at the south eastern corner of the lake.  Gerasene is the most likely location, today there is a town in the area called Khersa & near, by the Lake on a slope, are cavern tombs that have been used in the past as dwelling places.

The banishment & treatment of this man was incredible.  Wonder how he would fit into a modern context.

Vs. 6-7  The demons controlling the man know exactly who Jesus really is.  Better than even the disciples at that point:  “Jesus Son of the Most High God”  Probably was some kind of shock to his companions when Jesus did not deny it.  Remember, a few hours ago on the Lake they were wondering themselves who this guy really is, that has power to calm even the seas & winds.

Vs. 8-10  The conversation between Jesus and the demons which held power over the man is instructive.  Jesus actually ask the demons their identity.  They recognized the authority of Jesus to send them away.  The title ‘legion’ suggests that thousands of demons may have been involved, a Roman legion contained 6,000 men.  Breaking bonds & chains was a super human feat, however Jesus had power to defeat even an entire ‘legion’ of demons.

Vs. 11-13  One wonders if the demons caused the pigs to run into the lake, or whether the pigs themselves responded to the demons with such fear, that they stampeded into the lake and lost their own lives in the process.

Vs. 14-17  Notice how the Gerasenes responded by losing a large chunk of their economy.  They were afraid, did not understand, and asked Jesus & the boys to leave the area.  The ultimate ‘healer’ was among them, but they ask him to go.

Vs. 18-20  The man that was healed wanted to come with Jesus, but was told to stay and give his testimony to his friends and family.  Finally, the people were amazed. But Jesus and the disciples had moved on.  This was a lost opportunity for the people of this region to be blessed.  How many times do people today reject Jesus out of ignorance and fear, not really understanding who he really is and how their lives could be changed for the better.  Jesus is the ultimate healer of all times, even today, even for you.

Vs. 21-43 The Sick Woman & The Dead Little Girl

The head of the Synagogue in the area, Jairus,  sought out Jesus to come and heal his dying daughter.  Can you imagine the frustration of this man, as he walked with Jesus and was engulfed by the crowd, making travel very difficult.  Then Jesus stops and asked “who touched me?”.

Vs. 25-34  The crowd was pressing up against Jesus & the disciples.  A woman who was sick with a blood flow disorder believed that if she could just touch Jesus she would be healed & she did.  Actually according to the ‘Mosaic Law’, anyone who came in contact with a woman with this condition would be ‘defiled’.  Jesus was aware that healing power went out from him, and stopped the whole parade.  Jesus asks, “who touched my clothes?”.  The disciples were incredulous.  After all, thousand of people were bumping up against them.  At this point Jesus was as popular as the modern ‘rock star’.  The woman was rewarded for her faith and healed of her disease.

Vs. 35-37  In the mean time, the daughter of Jairus had died and messengers came to inform him.  Jesus tells him:  “Don’t be afraid; just believe.”  A tall order, and yet Jairus does respond and continues with Jesus.  Notice that Jesus only allows Peter, James, and John to go along for support.  He leaves behind the crowd & takes along only his top disciples, those who have observed his ministry from the beginning, and probably have the greatest faith among his  followers.

Vs. 38-40  They arrive at the home of Jairus, and a chaotic traditional mourning had already started.  The wealthy hired professional mourners in those days,  when there was a death in the family. The pros were already at it.  What a scene!  The supposed ‘mourners’ showed that they really did not care, they actually laughed when Jesus suggested that the girl was only sleeping.

Vs. 40-43  Jesus kicks them all out of the house and takes only the Father, mother and the three disciples into the room where the child was laying.  He wanted only those who were really concerned for the girl, and those who had at least some degree of faith, to be with him.  Jesus takes the hand of the girl and speaks here in Aramaic, “Talitha Koum!”, meaning- “Little girl, I say to you, get up!”–  AND SHE DOES.  To prove that she is back to normal, Jesus tells her parents to feed her.

*note: Jesus and his disciples probably spoke ‘Aramaic’ in their normal conversation.  Being from Galilee, they probably also spoke Greek, it was a mixed area and many spoke Greek, it was the language of commerce.  Also, they probably knew Hebrew.  There was a revival of the usage of Hebrew during the first century, particularly in the Synagogues and in Jerusalem.  We know that Jesus did read from the Scroll of Isaiah (Hebrew) in his home town.

Notice that Jesus ends this incredible miracle by instructing the family not to talk about it.  Can you imagine?  He actually did not want any greater fame & notoriety than he already had.  The forces of opposition were already plotting against him, perhaps greater fame could have brought on a sooner end to his ministry.

-Read Mark 6

*Top               **Home Page

>>>Don't Miss an Update!**Click Now**Receive ANSWERS Bible Study by Email<<<

Comments are closed.